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Thread: Another Rookie desperately seeking assistance ...

  1. #61
    Administrator Carl Leon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slice1900 View Post
    I remember 4-5 years ago seeing claims about installers preferring certain models of LNB because they felt they were more reliable or output a stronger signal, but they didn't agree on which brands. As with many things mass manufactured at the lowest possible cost, sometimes you have a "bad lot" and if a bunch of LNBs from one of those "bad lots" gets sent to a warehouse and deployed for a lot of customers in an installer's area, so if he got a bad lot from WNC in his area I could see him noticing a year or two later "wow, I seem to always be replacing WNC but never MTI or PBI" and forming a bias. Another installer who got a bad MTI lot might form a bias against them.
    I do recall a run of LNBs that were cold sensitive, now that you mention it, and I think it was specific to one manufacturer. Showed up during a particularly brutal winter a couple of years ago in the midwest.

  2. #62
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    May 16, 2019 Update

    Okay, so the latest is that we've ordered a brand new M.T.I. 3D2RBLNBR0-14 to replace the one we [mistakenly?] received via Amazon.

    In the interim, I want to add a post that covers what I've managed to learn about our own DTV system for the edification of the novices among us. We have covered quite a bit of ground in a fairly short amount of time, so it's my hope that all of the posts that have been --and will be -- added to this thread will be of use to others.

    As you examine the following diagram, please note that the color red was used to indicate the path used by our DTV system to transmit DC voltage levels. CAUTION: if you choose to eliminate the loss caused by the insertion of the DC POWER PASS SPLITTER shown in the diagram, be very careful to avoid connecting the Power Inserter's POWER TO SWM port to your Satellite Receiver input(s).

    ADDENDUM

    The phrase "main circuit panel's ground bar...," shown in the accompanying diagram, is used to identify the ground bar found in the circuit breaker panel closest to our electrical service meter. Although others may choose a different name for it, I was taught to refer to this circuit/breaker panel as the "Main" or "Primary" panel.

    Although this diagram and its accompanying notes were created with the health of the receiver in mind -- hence, the CAUTION in the preceding paragraph -- I want to clarify that the color yellow was used to emphasize the RF path [read: NO DC] in this setup ... so, if we were to experience some sort of video tiling (due to weakened signal strength), we could always remove the DC POWER PASS SPLITTER from the setup. If this ever becomes an issue, here's how I would address it:

    (1) Remove 120VAC line power from the Power Inserter (P.I.) ;
    (2) Disconnect all three coax lines from the DC POWER PASS SPLITTER shown in the diagram ;
    (3) Remove the 75-ohm end line termination from the SIGNAL TO IRD port on the P.I. ;
    (4) Connect the red POWER TO SWM port on the P.I. directly to the receiver side of the Grounding Block shown in the diagram ;
    (5) Assuming that all of the previous steps have been performed -- in numbered sequence -- connect the yellow SIGNAL TO IRD port on the P.I. directly to the Receiver input ;
    (6) Connect the P.I. to 120VAC line power.

    PLEASE NOTE that I am a novice to satellite television transmission theory, so, if you choose to employ the following diagram -- or the text given in his thread or in the diagram -- please proceed at your own risk. This setup is presently functioning without issue in our system. Once again, be very careful to keep the DC signal path -- depicted herein in RED -- isolated from the Receiver input(s).
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    Last edited by HandLogger; 05-17-2019 at 07:22 PM. Reason: Clarification of Optional Setup

  3. #63
    Senior Member caseyf5's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HandLogger View Post
    Okay, so the latest is that we've ordered a brand new M.T.I. 3D2RBLNBR0-14 to replace the one we [mistakenly?] received via Amazon.

    In the interim, I want to add a post that covers what I've managed to learn about our own DTV system for the edification of the novices among us. We have covered quite a bit of ground in a fairly short amount of time, so it's my hope that all of the posts that have been --and will be -- added to this thread will be of use to others.

    As you examine the following diagram, please note that the color red was used to indicate the path used by our DTV system to transmit DC voltage levels. CAUTION: if you choose to eliminate the loss caused by the insertion of the DC POWER PASS SPLITTER shown in the diagram, be very careful to avoid connecting the Power Inserter's POWER TO SWM port to your Satellite Receiver input(s).

    Hello HandLogger,
    A very easy to understand diagram as to how a basic satellite system is connected from the dish to the receiver.
    Yours,
    caseyf5

  4. #64
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    Ken984 & caseyf5 ~ Thanks very much for the encouragement. Obviously, we satellite television learners have to start somewhere.

    Please note that I added an addendum to the post containing our basic DTV system setup diagram. Why? Because I was asked if the DC POWER PASS SPLITTER depicted in the diagram was absolutely necessary and, having successfully used a setup without one, I had to answer "No" to that question. Bearing this in mind, I wanted to ensure that anyone reading Post #62 of this thread (the post with the setup diagram) would be clear about this before examining our setup.

  5. #65
    Administrator Carl Leon's Avatar
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    Great basic diagram.

    Many installations have multiple receivers (or DVRs or clients, etc.), so the splitter will be a multi-port as opposed to two port. There is still a power passing port, and the remaining ports non-power passing. While you could eliminate the splitter and simply use the receiver output of the power inserter (because you only have one receiver), other installations would need the splitter to be able to feed multiple locations.

    Another variation of the installation would be to put the splitter after the power inserter, in which case the power passing port would be irrelevant (you could connect anything to it, as it wouldn't be passing power). Installations that have a Genie that provides DC power to the LNB could eliminate the power inserter and route the Genie to the power passing port of the splitter, and the clients to the other splitter ports.

    Once you have the basics documented and understood, it becomes easier to visualize the other variations described in this post.

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